arrow-down arrow-down-double arrow-left-double arrow-right-double arrow-up arrow-up-double heart home menu movie profile quotes-close quotes-open reblog share behance deviantart dribbble facebook flickr flipboard github google-plus instagram linkedin pinterest soundcloud spotify twitter vimeo youtube tumblr heart-full website thumbtack
Vision Zero Boston
Loading...

Updates

Join our mailing list to get updates in your inbox.

Project Specific Updates

Citywide Updates

Aug 11, 2016

Mayor Walsh Issues Statement on Speed Limits in Boston

Mayor Martin J. Walsh today issued the following statement relative to lowering the default speed limit in Boston: 

“I am pleased that H. 4565, An Act modernizing municipal finance and government, signed by the Governor this week, will give municipalities the authority to lower default speed limits. Commissioner Fiandaca and I look forward to working with the Boston City Council once this law goes into effect to lower the default speed limit in Boston from 30 MPH to 25 MPH. We know that lower speed limits are an important tool in reducing fatal and serious crashes and creating safer streets for people of all ages and abilities who are walking, driving, and bicycling. A lower speed limit in Boston would be a major early accomplishment for our Vision Zero goal: bringing the number of traffic deaths and serious injuries to zero by 2030.“ 

July 29, 2016

Speed radar signs installed on Columbus Ave

Speed boards give motorists instant feedback on how fast they are going and flash when a driver exceeds the speed limit.

July 13, 2016

Parking Protected Bike Facility Demo

Yesterday, we installed a (very) temporary parking-protected bike lane on Beacon St in the Back Bay. This demonstration gave people the opportunity to experience this type of street design and to learn why this type of bike lane is good for people on bikes and other road users.

Parking-protected bike lanes provide a comfortable, safe place for people biking on our streets. Rather than having a bike lane between parked cars and moving cars, a parking-protected bike lane is between parked cars and the curb, reducing the risk of crashes due to opening car doors and double-parking.

Read more

June 28, 2016

Speed radar signs installed on Columbia Rd

Speed boards give motorists instant feedback on how fast they are going and flash when a driver exceeds the speed limit.

May 10, 2016

Speed radar signs installed on Commercial St and Bunker Hill St

Speed boards give motorists instant feedback on how fast they are going and flash when a driver exceeds the speed limit.

April 20, 2016

Speed radar sign installed on Washington St in Roslindale

Speed boards give motorists instant feedback on how fast they are going and flash when a driver exceeds the speed limit.

March 30, 2016

Speed radar signs installed on Pleasant St and Malcolm X Blvd

Speed boards give motorists instant feedback on how fast they are going and flash when a driver exceeds the speed limit.

March 5, 2016

Vision Zero Boston Crash Map Updated

We’ve update the Vision Zero Boston Crash Map to include injury and fatality data through the end of 2015. Click the “Yearly” button to view crashes that took place in 2015 and resulted in injuries or fatalities. When you zoom out the injury data is displayed as a heat map.

The updated data will allow us to learn more about where we should implement safety improvements. You can help guide these efforts by reporting your transportation safety concerns on this map.

February 28, 2016

Leading Pedestrian Interval Implemented at Beacon St & Mass Ave

To make it safer for pedestrians traveling on Mass Ave at Beacon St, we’ve implemented a leading pedestrian interval (also commonly referred to as an LPI). This helps a person who is driving see people walking by giving pedestrians a head start in crossing the street.

From our Complete Street Guidelines:

The Leading Pedestrian Interval (LPI) is when pedestrians are given the WALK indication 3 to 7 seconds before conflicting motor vehicles traveling in the same direction are given a green indication. Essentially, pedestrians are given a head start, allowing people to enter the crosswalk prior to turning vehicles, increasing visibility between all modes. The LPI should be timed so a pedestrian can travel across one lane of traffic or establish themselves in the intersection in front of turning vehicles.

February 23, 2016

Speed radar sign installed on Summer St

Speed boards give motorists instant feedback on how fast they are going and flash when a driver exceeds the speed limit.

February 11, 2016

Mayor Walsh Encourages People to Partner with the City to Improve Traffic Safety on Boston’s Streets

Citing an increase in traffic-related fatalities and severe injuries, Mayor Martin J. Walsh today urged people who drive, walk and bicycle in the City of Boston to stay safe by paying attention to the rules of the road and being aware of others who are also traveling on local streets.

“With a recent uptick in traffic-related injuries, it is critically important that people be very careful and obey the rules of the road to keep not only yourself but your fellow travelers safe,” said Mayor Walsh. “Our top priority is ensuring the safety of our residents, but we need the public’s support to help us eliminate all traffic-related fatalities on our streets. I thank the members of the Vision Zero Task Force for their work in identifying opportunities to improve roadway safety and I look forward to implementing the next steps in the Vision Zero Action Plan to create safer streets across our city.”  [Read More]

January 22, 2016

Mayor Walsh Announces the Vision Zero Boston Transportation Safety Concerns Map

Mayor Martin J. Walsh today announced the launch of the Vision Zero Boston Safety Concerns Map, an online tool that allows people to identify locations where they have concerns about transportation safety. Boston residents and visitors are encouraged to visit visionzeroboston.org/input, select the location of their concern, and add it to the map. People can also enter additional comments to concerns that were reported by others. [Read More]

December 12, 2015

View the Vision Zero Crash Map

Visit visionzeroboston.org/crashmap to see a map of crashes in the City of Boston from 07/14 - 09/15. We will continuously update this map as new data from the Boston Police Department (BPD) and Emergency Medical Services (EMS) as it becomes available. 

Each crash is classified as either an injury or a fatality.  “Injuries” are defined as any crash that results in a response from EMS. “Fatalities” are defined as any death that was caused by a crash. Since fatality data is provided by BPD, it only includes crashes that took place on City of Boston roads. In the future, we hope to be able to obtain fatality data from State agencies. The injury layer of the map shows both injuries and fatalities.

Our crash map is the first of its kind for the City of Boston, so we’re still working out some kinks. In rare cases a crash may be listed as both an injury and a fatality. If a person was injured during the crash and was transported to a hospital for treatment, then they would be reported as part of the EMS data. If the person later passed away from their injuries, and the crash took place on a Boston road, the crash would also be reported to us in the BPD data.

December 9, 2015

Mayor Walsh Announces the Release of the City of Boston’s Vision Zero Action Plan

Mayor Martin J. Walsh today announced the release of the City of Boston’s Vision Zero Action Plan. The plan outlines the City of Boston’s commitment to providing safer streets for all users of the city’s roadways, including working towards preventing serious crashes and eliminating traffic-related fatalities on local streets.

“Our Vision Zero Action Plan outlines a thoughtful strategy to improve roadway safety and put the City of Boston on track towards eliminating all traffic-related fatalities on our streets,” said Mayor Walsh. “Ensuring the safety of all of our residents and visitors is a top priority and it is important that we continue to make strides in creating better and safer streets across our city.” [Read More]

April 29, 2015

Vision Zero Task Force Created

Today, marked the final meeting of the Pedestrian Crash Surveillance Workgroup, an interagency committee focused on making Boston a safer City for pedestrians. The Workgroup will be given new life as the Vision Zero Task Force, which will work to eliminate fatal and serious traffic crashes in the city by 2030.

The Task Force members include the following City of Boston departments, commissions, and offices:

  • Commission on Affairs of the Elderly;
  • Commission for Persons with Disabilities;
  • Department of Innovation and Technology;
  • Emergency Medical Services;
  • Mayor’s Office of New Urban Mechanics;
  • Police Department;
  • Public Health Commission;
  • Public Schools;
  • Public Works Department;
  • Transportation Department;

and the Boston Cyclists Union and WalkBoston, who are long-standing partners to the City of Boston.

We, the members of the Task Force, look forward to working with you to determine the best ways to eliminate fatal and serious traffic crashes. You can stay in touch with us by joining our mailing list or e-mailing us at [email protected].

March 25, 2015

Mayor Walsh Announces Future Focused Transportation Improvements For Pedestrians, Cyclists and Drivers

Today, Mayor Martin J. Walsh announced five transportation initiatives to improve how individuals on foot, bike, or in a vehicle move around the City of Boston with a significant focus on improving public safety. The announcements include a complete streets approach to Commonwealth Avenue, featuring protected bike lane on from the BU Bridge to Packard’s Corner, the adoption of Vision Zero Boston, aimed at eliminating traffic fatalities in the city, the citywide replacement of parking meters with intelligent parking meters, and a pilot program to eliminate street sweeping towing. The initiatives are early action projects as part of Go Boston 2030 launched to imagine a bold new transportation plan for Boston for the next five, 10, and 15 years. Additionally, the Mayor and the Boston Transportation Department will begin a nationwide search for a new Active Transportation Director to think holistically about how our streets are used by people who walk, bike, and take transit. [Read More]

Loading...
Loading complete